Suicide in First World Countries (Part I)

Originally posted on KISMET Mindful Living:

This is quite interesting. I read about this a while ago and thought of blogging about it but it got swept under the rug.

I was thinking about following the stats of this practice and checking if it actually makes an impact in the suicide rate in South Korea… then it’ll definitely be a game changer. Maybe we can learn something from this practice no matter how odd.

 

Namaste!

LIVE  ❤ LAUGH … BELLE PAPILLON 

 

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Kismet

In yesterday’s post about First World Suicides, I mentioned that South Korea is #1 for suicide rates among the developed countries and they have held this position for the past eight years.

In a country where the pressures of ambition, achievement and success are omnipresent, students feel frustrated, anxious and ultimately, dejected. Up to 40 people commit suicide each day.

What is South Korea doing about this problem?

This:

2DA2DE9D00000578-3284587-Ground_breaking_Inside_a_death_experience_scheme_which_have_spru-a-1_1445537448805Daily Mail

Students are enrolling in “death experience” schools where they go undergo their own funerals. The hope and expectation is that students completing the program will learn to appreciate life again. Indeed, some of the graduates emerge with a sense of “cleansing” and “enlightenment.”

Young students are not the only clients. Others enrolling in these schools includes middle-aged people anxious about finances and the elderly who are afraid of being burdens on their families.

The program is designed to…

View original post 93 more words

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8 thoughts on “Suicide in First World Countries (Part I)

      1. I just want to keep an open mind and find an answer for those suffering from MI. I work in Mental Health and I’m a big patient advocate.
        I didn’t realize it was that bad in Australia. I was under the impression that most of you guys are Carpe Dieming a lot. 😉 I’m so jealous of my relatives who lived there all their lives. They’re always traveling, full of adventure, they seem unstoppable. I live vicariously through them.

        ❤ BP

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Ha. A lot of carping, for sure. We’re pretty typical, I think, of Western countries with our rates, most concern expressed for young males, but include farmers and a whole range of others as well – plenty of it about.

        Not enough hope or purpose in our world, I don’t think.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. I don’t want to sound like a religious fanatic but I feel that some of it may be blamed from being detached from “spirituality”… whatever it means for a particular person. I feel that it’s easier to find one’s life purpose when someone has a personal relationship with God or whatever that particular person calls their maker or divine being.

        Liked by 1 person

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