P.T.S.D.

I mentioned in my previous posts that since it’s “Suicide Awareness Month” I will be writing about Suicide awareness and other things related to it like depression, and today I want to bring awareness to the relation of “Suicide & PTSD

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PTSD, or Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, is a psychiatric disorder that can occur following the experience or witnessing of a life-threatening events such as military combat, natural disasters, terrorist incidents, serious accidents, or physical or sexual assault in adult or childhood. Most survivors of trauma return to normal given a little time. However, some people will have stress reactions that do not go away on their own, or may even get worse over time. These individuals may develop PTSD. People who suffer from PTSD often relive the experience through nightmares and flashbacks, have difficulty sleeping, and feel detached or estranged, and these symptoms can be severe enough and last long enough to significantly impair the person’s daily life.

People with PTSD experience 3 different kinds of symptoms. The first set of symptoms involves reliving the trauma in some way such as becoming upset when confronted with a traumatic reminder or thinking about the trauma when you are trying to do something else. The second set of symptoms involves either staying away from places or people that remind you of the trauma, isolating from other people, or feeling numb. The third set of symptoms includes things such as feeling on guard, irritable, or startling easily.

PTSD is marked by clear biological changes as well as psychological symptoms. PTSD is complicated by the fact that people with PTSD often may develop additional disorders such as depression, substance abuse, problems of memory and cognition, and other problems of physical and mental health. The disorder is also associated with impairment of the person’s ability to function in social or family life, including occupational instability, marital problems and divorces, family discord, and difficulties in parenting.

PTSD can be treated with psychotherapy (‘talk’ therapy) and medicines such as antidepressants. Early treatment is important and may help reduce long-term symptoms. Unfortunately, many people do not know that they have PTSD or do not seek treatment. (Source: ptsd.ne.gov)

Though only 10% of American forces see combat, the U.S. military now has the highest rate of post-traumatic stress disorder in its history. (Source: Vanity Fair)

 

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About 30% of the men and women who have spent time in war zones experience PTSD. An additional 20-25% have had partial PTSD at some point in their lives. More than 50% of all male Vietnam veterans and almost half of all female Vietnam veterans have experienced “clinically serious stress reaction symptoms.” PTSD has also been detected among veterans of other wars. Estimates of PTSD from the Gulf War are as high as 10%. Estimates from the war in Afghanistan are between 6-11%. Current estimates of PTSD in military personnel who served in Iraq range from 12% to 20%. (Source: ptsd.ne.gov)

 

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PTSD and the Military

When you are in the military, you may see combat. You may have been on missions that exposed you to horrible and life-threatening experiences. You may have been shot at, seen a buddy get shot, or seen death. These types of events can lead to PTSD.

The number of Veterans with PTSD varies by service era:

  • Operations Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Enduring Freedom (OEF): About 11-20 out of every 100 Veterans (or between 11-20%) who served in OIF or OEF have PTSD in a given year.
  • Gulf War (Desert Storm): About 12 out of every 100 Gulf War Veterans (or 12%) have PTSD in a given year.
  • Vietnam War: About 15 out of every 100 Vietnam Veterans (or 15%) were currently diagnosed with PTSD at the time of the most recent study in the late 1980s, the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study (NVVRS). It is estimated that about 30 out of every 100 (or 30%) of Vietnam Veterans have had PTSD in their lifetime.

Other factors in a combat situation can add more stress to an already stressful situation. This may contribute to PTSD and other mental health problems. These factors include what you do in the war, the politics around the war, where the war is fought, and the type of enemy you face.

Another cause of PTSD in the military can be military sexual trauma (MST). This is any sexual harassment or sexual assault that occurs while you are in the military. MST can happen to both men and women and can occur during peacetime, training, or war.

Among Veterans who use VA health care, about:

  • 23 out of 100 women (or 23%) reported sexual assault when in the military.
  • 55 out of 100 women (or 55%) and 38 out of 100 men (or 38%) have experienced sexual harassment when in the military.

There are many more male Veterans than there are female Veterans. So, even though military sexual trauma is more common in women Veterans, over half of all Veterans with military sexual trauma are men.

Sources

This fact sheet is based on a more detailed version located in the “Professional” section of our website: Epidemiology of PTSD.

 

REMEMBER, “SUICIDE IS 100% PREVENTABLE“…

 

VeteransCrisisLine

Namaste!

LIVE  ❤ LAUGH … Belle Papillon 

 

Thank you for taking the time to read this post. Please remember to like, comment, share, and “follow” and/or subscribe here before you leave. Have a blessed day!  Come join me on Twitter , Facebook and Instagram. See you there!🙂

 

 

 

 

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5 thoughts on “P.T.S.D.

  1. The insight you gave here really sheds light to the civilian world on exactly what ptsd is. Many view it as weakness and not an issue and with posts like this people will start to see that it is a brain injury and things like a car backfiring will put you back to the worst day of your life and it is something many vets have to deal with. Well done and thank you for your efforts to shed light on this very serious issue.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks. I appreciate your feedback. I am passionate about crushing the stigma on mental health illness and I feel strongly that increasing awareness and educating people leads to a more supportive environment that will hopefully and eventually lead to a better approach towards this issue.
      Namaste!

      Like

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